Yotam Ottolenghi’s ‘Plenty’: Mushroom and Herb Polenta

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My sisters bought me Yotam Ottolenghi’s Plenty for my birthday this year and I finally cooked from it last week. Plenty is a compilation of the most delightful recipes, which happen to not include meat. In the book’s introduction, Ottolenghi makes the point that he is not vegetarian, but the drive behind his vegetarian interest is the increased availability of old and new vegetables, and the ethical growing and sourcing of them.

This has given birth to an array of unique and delightful recipes which appeal to both carnivorous and herbivorous palates, without seeming to lack in “meat”. The deep and interesting flavour and texture combinations are also highly influenced by his European upbringing in the Middle East. A mingling of cultures that has clearly brought forth amazing results.

Well, it was finally time to try cooking from this cook book. And last week provided the perfect occasion. I’d invited a friend over for lunch, but only remembered days prior, that my friend’s father was a Parisian chef. No pressure! I had to find a dish to impress. And it had to be vegetarian. And I knew I would be short on time that day. As it turned out, Ottolenghi’s Plenty had a recipe that ticked all these boxes: Mushroom and Herb Polenta. It took about 40 minutes all up to make – and my friend loved it! Plenty, definitely a home-entertaining winner.

Recipe: http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2006/dec/16/foodanddrink.recipes1

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Camembert and Broccolini Frittatas

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So I went to my first Victorian farm party on the weekend. A barbecue was on the menu, however I’d been trying – very, very hard to remain vegetarian for Lent. But I was determined not to announce this at the party – I didn’t want to appear precious! Nevertheless, I wanted to bring a substitute that was more interesting and substantial than a salad, something that I would enjoy. So the decision was made: camembert and broccolini frittatas. Here’s the recipe …

Camembert and Broccolini Frittatas

Small bunch broccolini, chopped into bite size chunks

6 eggs

300mL cream

2 spring onions, chopped

1T tarragon, chopped

1t rosemary, chopped

handful of grated parmesan

salt and pepper

100g camembert, sliced into 12 pieces

Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 180˚C fan bake.
  2. Grease a 12-hole muffin tin.
  3. Steam or microwave the broccolini until al dente.
  4. Whisk eggs in a large bowl. Then whisk in the cream.
  5. Stir in the spring onions, tarragon, rosemary, and parmesan. Add salt and pepper to taste.
  6. Spoon the mixture into the muffin tin.
  7. Top each frittata with a slice of camembert.
  8. Bake about 18 minutes, or until set.

When ready, remove from the oven, cool slightly, and turn out to serve. New tip for tricky removal of frittatas from non-stick bakeware: Use a silicon spatula to scoop your cooked treats out. This will help preserve your bakeware, and your baked treats!

 

Baby Potato Halves with Garlic Aioli, Toasted Sesame Seeds, and Pistachios

Delicious and beautiful, this is an amazing dish to share. Imagine: Tender baby potatoes tossed with wholegrain mustard and garlic aioli … topped with a crumbling of toasted sesame seeds and pistachios … Trés jolie!

Baby Potato Halves with Garlic Aioli, Toasted Sesame Seeds, and Pistachios

1kg baby potatoes

Half a batch of aioli – I used Jamie Oliver’s aioli recipe, exchanging the Dijon mustard for wholegrain and using 2 whole garlic cloves (rather than just a half)

¼ c sesame seeds

½ c pistachio nuts

Method

  1. Wash the potatoes and cut them into halves.
  2. Boil the potatoes for 10-15 minutes, or until tender (but not mashable!). Leave to cool a little.
  3. Meanwhile, if you haven’t already done so, make the aioli. Then toast the sesame seeds in a pan over medium heat.
  4. Next, roughly chop the pistachios and toast them a little, in a pan, over medium heat.
  5. Combine the potatoes and aioli. Transfer to a platter.
  6. Just before serving, sprinkle over sesame seeds and pistachios.

Coconut, Pumpkin, and Carrot Soup

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I’ve been waiting for the perfect opportunity to cook with coconut oil. I love coconut and it seems to be the superfood ‘flavour of the month’. Proselytising many (women at least), it’s being hailed as a mega-electrolyte source, an age-defying elixir, and of course, an aid to weight loss.

Back to coconut oil … I had some carrots in the fridge and so decided to make pumpkin carrot soup. Hence the (coconut oil) opportunity. I would sauté the vegetables in coconut oil and then also add coconut milk, to produce a rich coconut flavour. I would also add ginger and, at the end, chilli flakes and lime. Sounding Thai? I hoped so!

To get the vegetables to liquids ratio right, I sought guidance from Jamie’s Pumpkin and Ginger soup recipe.

Here’s what my recipe ended up looking like:

Coconut, Pumpkin, and Carrot Soup

1T coconut oil

1kg pumpkin

250g carrots

large thumb of grated ginger

1L vegetable stock

200mL coconut milk

chilli flakes to taste

salt and pepper

half a lime

Method

  1. Cut pumpkin and carrots into chunks.
  2. Heat coconut oil in a large pot and sauté pumpkin and carrots.
  3. Add ginger, vegetable stock, coconut milk, and chilli flakes.
  4. Bring mixture to the boil and then simmer for 40 minutes until vegetables are tender enough to mash or process.
  5. Mash or process soup mixture, to develop a texture to your liking (smooth or chunky).
  6. Season with salt and pepper and add a squeeze of lime before serving.

Quick Low-fat Mushroom Lasagne with White Wine and Lemon Ricotta

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Coming up with ways to use left-over wine is one of my favourite dilemmas. “Left-over” wine? Yes.

Regardless of how it’s neglected, I’ll always take the opportunity to enrich a meal with it. In this case, it was white wine and I decided to make a low-fat mushroom lasagne with it.

When making ‘skinny’ meals, I work extra hard to ensure they’re full of flavour. Why make healthy-eating torture? The wine would add depth and flavour to the mushrooms; and the low-calorie ‘creamy’ partner would be a low-fat ricotta. For lift and complexity, I also added lemon zest to the ricotta.

As usual, I researched the net for mushroom ricotta lasagne recipes, before deciding on how I would shape my own recipe. I based my initial structure on the BBC’s GoodFood Quick Mushroom & Lasagne recipe:

My key changes to the recipe were:

  • Adding white wine to the mushrooms
  • Adding lemon rind to the ricotta
  • Sautéeing the onions and mushrooms in a tablespoon of butter, for a hint of traditional comfort

Quick Low-fat Mushroom Lasagne with White Wine and Lemon Ricotta

1 T butter

3 garlic cloves, crushed

1 small onion, diced

250g white button mushrooms, sliced

250mL white wine

pepper to taste

100g baby spinach

500g light ricotta cheese

grated rind of one lemon

6 fresh lasagne sheets

50g grated parmesan

Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 200˚C /180˚C fan bake.
  2. Prepare a 19cm x 28cm baking dish with cooking spray.
  3. Melt butter in a large frying pan and sauté garlic and onion until onion is soft.
  4. Add mushrooms and cook until soft.
  5. Add white wine and cook until liquid has reduced to a small sauce. Season with cracked pepper.
  6. Add spinach and cook until just wilted.
  7. In a medium-sized bowl, combine ricotta and lemon rind.
  8. Line the baking dish with two sheets of lasagne, followed by the mushroom mixture. Add another layer of lasagne, then the ricotta. Sprinkle half of the parmesan over the ricotta. Finish with a final layer of lasagne, followed by the remaining parmesan.
  9. Bake for 35 minutes, until the top is golden and the lasagne is cooked through.

Pantry treats: Clafoutis

As a rule, I try not to shop too far ahead – food-wise – in case plans fall through, or I change my mind. However, sometimes my desire for being prepared and organised overtakes! On this occasion, I’d bought ingredients for a cherry custard tart. Sure enough, plans fell through. A rich custard treat for one was out of the question, but I still had eggs that needed using …

My solution? A cherry clafoutis. A clafoutis is a French pudding, which has become one of my ’pantry’ recipes for quick and delicious; cheap and easy; low-fat and healthy. And the choice of fruit? Well, yes cherries are out of season, but I got some preserved ones for a steal at the supermarket!

Recipe-wise, there are a myriad of interpretations out there. Some that use two eggs, three eggs, six … varying amounts of milk, flour, and butter … and some recipes even call for ground nuts! Yum.

On this occasion I was looking for a recipe that used just a few eggs; ‘healthy’ enough to be enjoyed over several serves. But I also wanted a stodgy pudding to provide some winter comfort. This led me to Neil Perry’s recipe on goodfood, which sits in the middle of the road, clafoutis-wise. It uses three eggs and a cup of flour, perfect for my intent and purpose.

Here’s the result!

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Recipe: Cherry clafoutis